Article related to mural:  Franklinton Garden Project
Title:   Garden Murals Spring Up In Franklinton
Author:   John Ross
Published In:   Columbus Alive!
Date:    June 13, 2011
URL (when active): 
http://www.columbusalive.com/content/stories/2011/07/13/garden-murals-spring-up-in-franklinton.html

Garden Murals Spring Up In Franklinton

Franklinton Gardens pic

Art and agriculture will combine when local painters create new murals in Avondale Garden, part of a community-garden collective growing food and revamping abandoned spaces west of Downtown.

The Garden Mural Project will run 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on consecutive Saturdays, July 16 and 23. If it rains this weekend, all work will be completed July 23.

"We want to create warm, welcoming spaces - places where our neighbors can come into, connect and experience a community," said Patrick Kaufman, co-director of Franklinton Gardens. "This event itself will highlight the gardening efforts we have and to further beautify a garden space that we've had for five years now."

In a neighborhood pocked with vacant houses and trash-filled lots, every improvement goes a long way, Kaufman explained. Plants and panels both can make a space pretty, inviting and more productive.

The Avondale plot is one of six operated by the Franklinton organization, which produced 2,500 pounds of food in 2010 and this year might double that amount.

The mural project marks the first collaboration between the garden group and the Franklinton Arts District, which solicited entries for the project. The entry deadline was July 11.

"Patrick and I met, and I loved the idea of the gardens," said Sarah Weinstock, president of the arts group. "We were really into in combining our efforts to do something with a lot of overlap."

During the next two weekends, 10 new panels measuring four feet by eight feet will join ones that Weinstock previously painted and already placed on site. Project entries were to be themed around community, a broad category that was meant to give artists a good deal of creativity.

"It's definitely going to beautify these gardens," Weinstock said. "The paintings that are created there will stay there."